House Legislation – 116th Congress

The NATO Support Act (H.R. 676), introduced by Representative Jimmy Pannetta (CA-20), prohibits funds from being used to withdraw the United States from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). In the wake of President Trump’s wavering commitment to NATO, this legislation was a critical signal to allies that Congress supports the alliance. The House passed the bill by a vote of 357-22. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

The Climate Action Now Act (H.R. 9), introduced by Representative Kathy Castor (FL-14), prevents funds from being used to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement and requires the President to develop and update annually a plan for the United States to meet its obligations under the Paris Climate Agreement. The United States’ withdrawal from the Paris Climate agreement was an abdication of leadership in the face of a global crisis. The House passed the legislation by a vote of 231-190. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

The Securing America’s Federal Elections (SAFE) Act (H.R. 2722), introduced by Representative Zoe Lofgren (CA-19), improves election security by establishing federal election requirements and awarding grants to carry out certain activities to increase election security. In the face of increased cyber attacks, it is vital that the United States take action to defend our electoral systems and our democracy. The House passed the bill by a vote of 225-184. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

The House of Representatives considered many pieces of legislation signaling strong congressional support for democracy and human rights around the world. To reflect this, Foreign Policy for America chose to score a collection of important bills. We supported each of the following bills and scored positively Representatives who voted in favor of all four.

  • The Saudi Arabia Human Rights and Accountability Act (H.R. 2037), introduced by Representative Tom Malinowski (NJ-07), requires the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) to report to Congress about the killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi and imposes related sanctions.
    • The House passed the bill by a vote of 405-7.
  • The Burma Unified through Rigorous Military Accountability (BURMA) Act (H.R. 3190), introduced by Representative Eliot Engel (NY-16), impose sanctions against Burmese officials responsible for serious human rights abuses and authorizes humanitarian aid for Burma, Bangladesh, and the surrounding region, including aid for ethnic minorities targeted by Burma’s military and support for voluntary resettlement of displaced persons.
    • The House passed the bill by a vote of 394-21.
  • The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act (S. 1838), introduced by Senator Marco Rubio (FL), requires that the State Department certify annually whether Hong Kong is upholding the rule of law and warrants its unique status under U.S. law, and imposes sanctions on those responsible for human rights violations in Hong Kong.
    • The House passed the bill by a vote of 417-1.
  • The Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act (S. 3744), introduced by Senator Marco Rubio (FL), imposes sanctions on foreign individuals and entities responsible for human rights abuses in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous region.
    • The House passed the bill by a vote of 413-1.

The Corporate Transparency Act (H.R. 2513), introduced by Representative Carolyn Maloney (NY-12), improves financial transparency and cracks down on money laundering schemes by requiring the disclosure of beneficial ownership of corporate entities. Transparency measures mitigate the risks associated with corrupt money laundering operations. The House passed the bill by a vote of 249-173. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

Supporting gender equality means empowering women across every aspect of their lives. In reflection of that, Foreign Policy for America chose to score a collection of legislation that encompasses many of the areas in which women are either excluded or disproportionately affected across the world. We scored positively members who cosponsored at least three of these bills:

  • The International Violence Against Women Act (H.R. 5267), introduced by Representative Jan Schakowsky, would require the United States to develop a global strategy to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 138 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Keeping Girls in School Act (H.R. 2153), introduced by Representative Lois Frankel (FL-21), improves access for adolescent girls around the world to receive a secondary education.
    • This legislation garnered 117 cosponsors in the House in the 116th Congress and ultimately was passed by voice vote.
  • The Support UNFPA Funding Act (H.R. 4722), introduced by Representative Chrissy Houlahan (PA-06), would restore U.S. funding for the United Nations Population Fund.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 126 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Afghan Women’s Inclusion in Negotiations Act (H.R. 4097), introduced by Representative William Keating (MA-09), would require the State Department to report on the participation of women in the Afghan peace process.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 38 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Global Health, Empowerment and Rights (HER) Act (H.R. 1055), introduced by Representative Nita Lowey (NY-17), would repeal the “global gag” rule.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 197 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Women and Climate Change Act (H.R. 1880), introduced by Representative Barbara Lee (CA-13), would address climate change and its specific effects on women and girls.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 55 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Greater Leadership Overseas for the Benefit of Equality (GLOBE) Act (H.R. 3874), introduced by Representative Dina Titus (NV-01), would enhance protections for LGBTQI+ individuals around the world.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 87 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Reproductive Rights are Human Rights Act (H.R. 1581), introduced by Representative Katherine Clark (MA-05), would require the annual human rights report to include the status of reproductive rights in countries receiving U.S. foreign assistance.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 145 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Safe from the Start Act (H.R. 4092), introduced by Representative Grace Meng (NY-06), would help prevent gender-based violence around the world.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 50 cosponsors in the House.
  • The Girls’ Leadership, Engagement, Agency, and Development (LEAD) Act (H.R. 6626), introduced by Representative David Trone (MD-06), would require a U.S. strategy to strengthen adolescent participation, particularly girls, in democracy and governance.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 46 cosponsors in the House.

The Global Health, Empowerment, and Rights (HER) Act (H.R. 1055), introduced by Representative Nita Lowey (NY-17), would end the dangerous Mexico City Policy, also known as the “global gag rule,” which threatens to pull U.S. funding from foreign NGOs who discuss a full range of reproductive health and family planning options with women. Under President Trump, the Mexico City Policy was dramatically expanded, impeding U.S. partnerships with health organizations on the frontlines of the fight against COVID-19 and Ebola. This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 197 cosponsors in the House. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

● Representative Schakowsky introduced the International Violence Against Women Act (H.R. 5034)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 142 cosponsors in the House.
● The Women, Peace, and Security Act (H.R. 2484) was introduced by Representative Noem.
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 16 cosponsors in the House.
● Representative Royce introduced the Women’s Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment Act (H.R. 5480)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 12 cosponsors in the House.
● The Greater Leadership Overseas for the Benefit of Equality Act (H.R. 7291) was introduced by Representative Titus.
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 7 cosponsors in the House.
● Representative Lee introduced the Women and Climate Change Act (H.R. 4932)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 55 cosponsors in the House.
● The Keeping Girls in School Act (H.R. 7055) was introduced by Representative Frankel
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 11 cosponsors in the House.
● Representative Lowey introduced the Global Health, Empowerment, and Rights Act (H.R. 671)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 165 cosponsors in the House.
● The Reproductive Rights are Human Rights Act (H.R. 7228) was introduced by Representative Clark.
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 55 cosponsors in the House.

H.Amdt. 354 to H.R. 2740, introduced by Representative Jim Banks (IN-03), would have cut funding for the State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) by 14 percent. For decades, the United States has failed to properly invest in our non-military tools for engaging the world. This reckless proposal would have exacerbated that trend, with catastrophic results for US diplomacy and assistance programs. The House rejected the amendment by a vote of 123-303. Foreign Policy for America opposed the amendment.

S.J.Res. 68, introduced by Senator Tim Kaine (VA), invoked the War Powers Resolution to remove U.S. armed forces from hostilities with Iran following the assassination of Major General Qassem Soleimani. The Trump administration repeatedly took actions that escalated tensions with Iran. This measure exercised the powers assigned to Congress by the constitution to check the executive branch. The House passed the resolution by a vote of 227-186. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

H.Res. 326, introduced by Representative Alan Lowenthal (CA-47) introduced, expresses the sense of the House of Representatives that U.S. efforts to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict should be through a negotiated two-state solution and that unilateral Israeli annexation of parts of the West Bank will make a peaceful resolution to the conflict more difficult to achieve. The House passed the resolution by a vote of 226-188. Foreign Policy for America supported the resolution.

H.J.Res. 46, introduced by Representative Joaquin Castro (TX-20), terminates the national emergency President Trump declared to bypass Congress and use unrelated military construction funding to build a border along the U.S.-Mexico border. President Trump’s border wall was a costly and ineffective approach to illegal immigration, rooted in racist rhetoric, and his declaration of national emergency was an obvious attempt to circumvent congressional authority. The House passed the resolution by a vote of 245-182. Foreign Policy for America supported the resolution.

H.Amdt. 509 to H.R. 2500, offered by Representative Jackie Speier (CA-14), requires that qualifications for eligibility to serve in in the military account only for the ability of an individual to meet gender-neutral occupational standards, effectively overturning the Trump administration’s discriminatory ban on transgender individuals from serving in the military. Anyone who meets the necessary qualifications should be allowed to serve in the U.S. military. The House passed the amendment by a vote of 242-187. Foreign Policy for America supported the amendment.

H.Amdt. 553 to H.R. 2500, introduced by Representative Michael Turner (OH-10), would have struck language prohibiting the deployment of the W76-2 submarine-launched ballistic missile, considered a “low-yield” nuclear warhead. A so-called “low-yield” nuclear weapon is largely seen as a more “usable” nuclear weapon, which raises concerns that it could be used on the battlefield as part of a military escalation. This House rejected the amendment by a vote of 201-221. Foreign Policy for America opposed the amendment.

The National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants (NO BAN) Act (H.R. 2214), introduced by Representative Judy Chu (CA-27), reverses the Trump administration’s discriminatory Muslim travel ban. The travel ban did nothing to protect Americans or enhance U.S. national security. The House passed the legislation as an amendment to an unrelated bill by a vote of 233-183. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) Implementation Act (H.R. 5430), introduced by Representative Steny Hoyer (MD-05), implements the statutory provisions necessary to ensure U.S. compliance with the renegotiated trade agreement. The renegotiated deal improved protection of labor rights. The House passed the bill by a vote of 385-41. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

H.Amdt. 343 to H.R. 2740, introduced by Representative Paul Gosar (AZ-04), would have prohibited funds from being used for U.S. contributions to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, or the Green Climate Fund, all three of which are crucial to the global fight against climate change. This House rejected the amendment by a vote 174-244. Foreign Policy for America opposed the amendment.

Legislation introduced by Representative Barbara Lee (CA-13) repeals the 2002 authorization for the use of military force (AUMF). The 2002 AUMF to invade Iraq has long since outlived its original mission, but because it included no sunset, it continues to be exploited and used beyond Congress’ original intent. The House passed the legislation as an amendment to the No War with Iran Act by a vote of 236-166. Foreign Policy for America supported the amendment.

S.J.Res. 7, introduced by Senator Bernie Sanders (VT), invokes the War Powers Resolution to remove U.S. forces from hostilities and cease U.S. participation in the Yemen civil war. The Saudi-led war in Yemen has contributed to the largest humanitarian crisis in the world, and must be ended through diplomacy. The House passed the measure by a vote of 247-175. Foreign Policy for America supported the measure.

Senate Legislation – 116th Congress

The American Innovation and Manufacturing Act (S. 2754), introduced by Senator John Kennedy (LA), brings U.S. regulations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in line with U.S. obligations under the Kigali amendment to the Montreal Protocol. That represents a significant contribution to curbing U.S. carbon emissions and restoring U.S. leadership on climate change. The legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 34 cosponsors and was ultimately included in the FY21 omnibus spending bill. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation and scored positively those who cosponsored it.

The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act (S. 1838), introduced by Senator Marco Rubio (FL), requires that the State Department certify annually whether Hong Kong is upholding the rule of law and warrants its unique status under U.S. law, and imposes sanctions on those responsible for human rights violations in Hong Kong. The legislation garnered 57 cosponsors in the 116th Congress, and ultimately was passed by the Senate by unanimous consent. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation and scored positively those who cosponsored it.

● Senator Corker introduced S.Res.368, a resolution supporting the right of all Iranian citizens to have their voices heard
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 44 cosponsors in the Senate.
● Senator Markey introduced S. 3020, the International Human Rights Defense Act
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 36 cosponsors in the Senate.
● Senator McCain introduced S. 2060, the Burma Human Rights and Freedom Act
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 24 cosponsors in the Senate.

Supporting gender equality means empowering women across every aspect of their lives. In reflection of that, Foreign Policy for America chose to score a collection of legislation that encompasses many of the areas in which women are either excluded or disproportionately affected across the world. We scored positively members who cosponsored at least three of these bills:

  • The Global Health, Empowerment, and Rights (HER) Act (S. 368), introduced by Senator Jeanne Shaheen (NH), would repeal the “global gag” rule.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 47 cosponsors in the Senate.
  • The Women and Climate Change Act (S. 868), introduced by Senator Mazie Hirono (HI), would address climate change and its specific effects on women and girls.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 6 cosponsors in the Senate.
  • The Greater Leadership Overseas for the Benefit of Equality (GLOBE) Act (S. 3004), introduced by Senator Ed Markey (MA), would enhance protections for LGBTQI+ individuals around the world.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 20 cosponsors in the Senate.
  • The Reproductive Rights are Human Rights Act (S. 707), introduced by Senator Bob Menendez (NJ), would require the annual human rights report to include the status of reproductive rights in countries receiving U.S. foreign assistance.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 33 cosponsors in the Senate.
  • The Keeping Women and Girls Safe from the Start Act (S. 4003), introduced by Senator Bob Menendez (NJ), would help prevent gender-based violence around the world.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 20 cosponsors in the Senate.
  • The Girls’ Leadership, Engagement, Agency, and Development (LEAD) Act (S. 2766), introduced by Senator Susan Collins (ME), would require a U.S. strategy to strengthen adolescent participation, particularly girls, in democracy and governance.
    • This legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 12 cosponsors in the Senate.

S.Res. 579, introduced by Senator Dick Durbin (IL), recognizes historic U.S. leadership and international achievements to address global health threats, encourages the international community to remain committed to preventing the further spread of COVID-19 (i.e., coronavirus disease 2019), and urges the United States to participate in and support the global efforts to address COVID-19. The resolution garnered 41 cosponsors and ultimately was passed by the Senate by unanimous consent. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation and scored positively those who cosponsored it.

S.Amdt. 902 to S.Amdt. 901 to H.R. 3401, introduced by Senator Rand Paul (KY), would have rescinded $4,586,000,000 from foreign assistance and exchange programs. Our foreign assistance programs are a cost effective means to advance Americans’ prosperity, security, and values. The Senate voted to block the amendment by a vote of 77-15. Foreign Policy for America opposed the amendment and supported the motion to table it.

S.J.Res. 68, introduced by Senator Tim Kaine (VA), invoked the War Powers Resolution to remove U.S. armed forces from hostilities with Iran following the assassination of Major General Qassem Soleimani. The Trump administration repeatedly took actions that escalated tensions with Iran. This measure exercised the powers assigned to Congress by the constitution to check the executive branch. The Senate passed the measure by a vote of 55-45. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

H.J.Res. 46, introduced by Representative Joaquin Castro (TX-20), terminates the national emergency President Trump declared to bypass Congress and use unrelated military construction funding to build a border along the U.S.-Mexico border. President Trump’s border wall was a costly and ineffective approach to illegal immigration, rooted in racist rhetoric, and his declaration of national emergency was an obvious attempt to circumvent congressional authority. The Senate passed the measure by a vote of 59-41. Foreign Policy for America supported the resolution.

S. 246, introduced by Senator Chris Murphy (CT), would prohibit the use of funds to carry out President Trump’s discriminatory Muslim travel ban. The travel ban did nothing to protect Americans or enhance U.S. national security. The legislation concluded the 116th Congress with 33 cosponsors in the Senate. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation and scored positively those who cosponsored it.

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) Implementation Act (H.R. 5430), introduced by Representative Steny Hoyer (MD-05), implements the statutory provisions necessary to ensure U.S. compliance with the renegotiated trade agreement. The renegotiated deal improved protection of labor rights. The Senate passed the bill by a vote of 89-10. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

A series of joint resolutions (S.J.Res. 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 37, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, and 48) introduced by Senator Bob Menendez (D-NJ) disapproved of specific arms sales that could be used in the Yemen civil war. The Saudi-led war in Yemen has contributed to the largest humanitarian crisis in the world, and must be ended through diplomacy. The resolutions were considered in an en bloc package. The Senate passed the package by a vote of 51-45. Foreign Policy for America supported the legislation.

House Legislation – 115th Congress

H.R. 3219, introduced by Representative Granger, provided funding for President Trump’s U.S.-Mexico border wall, which was rooted in racist campaign rhetoric and has the potential to significantly damage our relationship with Mexico, one of the United States’ largest trading partners.. The House passed this bill on July 27, 2017, by a vote of 235-192. Foreign Policy for America opposed this legislation.

The Perry Amendment (H. Amdt. 17) to the National Defense Authorization Act would have blocked research on the impacts of climate change on our military and adopts an anti-science stance by diminishing America’s leadership role in tackling climate change. The House failed to agree to the amendment on July 13, 2017, by a vote of 185-234. Foreign Policy for America opposed this amendment.

House Speaker Ryan introduced H. Res. 397, this resolution reaffirmed the commitment of the United States to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s principle of collective defense, also known as Article 5, which states that an attack on one is an attack on all. NATO member nations have only invoked Article 5 once, as a commitment to their allies, after the 9/11 attacks against the United States. The House passed to the House Resolution on June 27, 2017, by a vote of 423-4. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo Democracy and Accountability Act (H.R. 6207), introduced by Representative Smith from New Jersey, took important steps to promote democracy, human rights, transparency, and the rule of law in the DRC by urging the president to support U.N efforts and requiring the U.S. State Department to report on human rights abuses and corruption.The House passed this bill on November 27, 2018, by a vote of 374-11. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation.

The Global Food Security Reauthorization Act (H.R. 5129), introduced by Representative Smith from New Jersey, extended life-saving anti-hunger initiatives by the U.S. State Department and USAID through 2021. These programs were originally authorized under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 133 cosponsors in the House. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation and scored those who cosponsored it positively.

Representative Huizenga introduced H. J. Res. 41, which blocked the implementation of the bipartisan Cardin-Lugar anti-corruption provision of the Dodd Frank Act legislation, which required that oil, gas, and mining companies disclose payments to foreign governments. The House passed this bill on February 1, 2017, by a vote of 235-187. Foreign Policy for America opposed this legislation.

Supporting gender equality means empowering women across every aspect of their lives. In reflection of that, Foreign Policy for America chose to score a collection of legislation that encompasses many of the areas in which women are either excluded or disproportionately affected across the world. We scored members who cosponsored at least half of these bills positively:

● Representative Schakowsky introduced the International Violence Against Women Act (H.R. 5034)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 142 cosponsors in the House.
● The Women, Peace, and Security Act (H.R. 2484) was introduced by Representative Noem.
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 16 cosponsors in the House.
● Representative Royce introduced the Women’s Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment Act (H.R. 5480)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 12 cosponsors in the House.
● The Greater Leadership Overseas for the Benefit of Equality Act (H.R. 7291) was introduced by Representative Titus.
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 7 cosponsors in the House.
● Representative Lee introduced the Women and Climate Change Act (H.R. 4932)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 55 cosponsors in the House.
● The Keeping Girls in School Act (H.R. 7055) was introduced by Representative Frankel
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 11 cosponsors in the House.
● Representative Lowey introduced the Global Health, Empowerment, and Rights Act (H.R. 671)
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 165 cosponsors in the House.
● The Reproductive Rights are Human Rights Act (H.R. 7228) was introduced by Representative Clark.
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 55 cosponsors in the House.

The Strengthening Oversight of Iran’s Access to Finance Act (H. R. 4324), introduced by Representative Williams, violated U.S. obligations under the Iran nuclear deal (also known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA) by limiting the ability of U.S. companies to sell commercial passenger aircraft to Iran which was permitted under the agreement. The House passed this bill on December 14, 2017, by a vote of 252-167. Foreign Policy for America opposed this legislation.

Representative Lowey introduced the Global Health, Empowerment, and Rights (HER) Act, which would put an end to the dangerous Mexico City Policy, also known as the “global gag rule,” which threatens to pull U.S. funding from foreign NGOs who discuss a full range of reproductive health and family planning options with women. Under President Trump, the Mexico City Policy was dramatically expanded, impeding U.S. partnerships with health organizations on the frontlines of the fight against HIV/AIDS and the Ebola virus. This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 165 cosponsors in the House. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation and scored those who cosponsored it positively.

The Hartzler Amendment (H. Amdt 183) to the National Defense Authorization Act would have denied medical services related to gender transition to active American military personnel. The House failed to pass this amendment on July 13, 2017, by a vote of 209-214. Foreign Policy for America opposed this amendment.

The Lee Amendment (H.Amdt. 737) to the  Energy and Water, Legislative Branch, and Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Act would have stripped the bill of $65 million for the W76-2 warhead and transfer it to the Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation account. The W76-2 is an unnecessary and dangerous warhead that experts agree is only likely to escalate a nuclear conflict. Congress should maintain or increase funds for nuclear, chemical, and biological nonproliferation and arms control programs. The House failed to pass this amendment on June 7, 2018, by a vote of 177-241. Foreign Policy for America supported this amendment.

The Yoho Amendment (H. Amdt. 330) would have blocked all U.S. financial support for the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC), the UN Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), and the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) – a move that would have dramatically reduced U.S. influence in these multilateral bodies and threatened the continuing operations of UNRWA. The House failed to pass the amendment on July 13, 2017, by a vote of 185-234. Foreign Policy for America opposed this amendment.

H.R. 3364, introduced by Congressman Royce, the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA), limited President Trump’s ability to unilaterally lift sanctions on Russia and added new sanctions against Russia’s energy and military sector while also implementing sanctions on North Korea and Iran. American intelligence agencies unanimously agreed that the Russian government directed an efforts to undermine and influence the 2016 presidential election. Russia also attacked and supports ongoing operations in Ukraine and annexed Crimea. The House passed the bill on July 25, 2017, by a vote of 419 to 3. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation.

Senate Legislation – 115th Congress

Senator Rand Paul introduced an amendment (S.Amdt.871) to the National Defense Authorization Act, which would have repealed the 2001 and 2002 Authorizations for Use of Military Force (AUMF), which have been used in the 18 years since to pursue endless counterterrorism operations in an expanding array of countries, and prompted a much needed debate in Congress over U.S. counterterrorism policy. The Senate passed a motion to table the amendment on September 13, 2017, by a vote of 61-36, therefore killing the amendment. Foreign Policy for America supported this amendment.

Senator Coons’ amendment (S.Amdt. 1955) to the Uniting and Securing America Act rejected funding for President Trump’s border wall while paving a path to citizenship for the Dreamers. The Senate failed to pass the amendment on February 15, 2018, by a vote of 52-47. The amendment needed a 3/5ths majority to pass. Foreign Policy for America supported this amendment.

Senator Reed introduced a Motion to instruct the conferees, which reaffirmed the commitment of the United States to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s principle of collective defense, also known as Article 5, which states that an attack on one is an attack on all. NATO member nations have only invoked Article 5 once, as a commitment to their allies, after the 9/11 attacks against the United States. The Senate passed a motion to instruct on July 10, 2018, by a vote of 97-2. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation. 

Senator Flake introduced the Freedom for Americans to Travel to Cuba Act (S.1287), which would protect Americans’ ability to travel to and from Cuba, boosting people-to-people interactions and business ties between Americans and Cubans. It would also  This legislation was never voted on, but concluded the 115th Congress with 54 cosponsors in the Senate. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation and scored those who cosponsored it positively.

Many pieces of legislation would strengthen American support for democracy and human rights throughout the world. To reflect this, we choose to score cosponsorship on a collection of bills that would encourage political, economic, and social reforms around the world, particularly among partner states. Foreign Policy for America supported the following pieces of legislation and scored senators who cosponsored 2 out of the 3 pieces of legislation positively.

● Senator Corker introduced S.Res.368, a resolution supporting the right of all Iranian citizens to have their voices heard
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 44 cosponsors in the Senate.
● Senator Markey introduced S. 3020, the International Human Rights Defense Act
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 36 cosponsors in the Senate.
● Senator McCain introduced S. 2060, the Burma Human Rights and Freedom Act
   ○ This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 24 cosponsors in the Senate.

Congressman Huizenga introduced H.J. Res. 41, this bill blocked the implementation of the bipartisan Cardin-Lugar anti-corruption provision of the Dodd Frank Act, which required that oil, gas, and mining companies disclose payments to foreign governments. The Senate passed this Joint Resolution on February 3, 2017, by a vote of 52-47. Foreign Policy for America opposed this legislation.    

Senator Shaheen introduced S. 210, the Global Health, Empowerment, and Rights (HER) Act, which would put an end to the dangerous Mexico City Policy, also known as the “global gag rule,” which threatens to pull U.S. funding from foreign NGOs who discuss a full range of reproductive health and family planning options with women. Under President Trump, the Mexico City Policy was dramatically expanded, impeding U.S. partnerships with health organizations on the frontlines of the fight against HIV/AIDS and the Ebola virus. This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 47 cosponsors in the Senate. Foreign Policy for America supports this legislation and scored those who cosponsored it positively.

When Senator Corker originally introduced S. 722 , the Countering Iran’s Destabilizing Activities Act it violated U.S. obligations under the  Iran nuclear deal (also known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA) by instituting sanctions that were not in compliance of the JCPOA. This legislation had 50 cosponsors prior to revisions being made, on May 25th, 2017, that brought it back into compliance with the JCPOA. Foreign Policy for America opposed this legislation prior to the revisions being made in May and scored Senators who cosponsored the legislation before the revisions were made negatively.    

Senator Schatz introduced S. 1366, the Restore Honor to Service Members Act,  which would have addressed the historic wrong of military discharges given to service members because of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy by changing the characterization of the discharge to honorable, if they were discharged because of their sexual orientation.This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 31 cosponsors in the Senate. Foreign Policy for America supports this legislation and scored those who cosponsored it positively.

S.1979, introduced by Senator Murphy, would have blocked the implementation of President Trump’s Muslim ban by preventing any funding from being used for its implementation. This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 32 cosponsors in the Senate. Foreign Policy for America supports this legislation and scored those who cosponsored it positively. 

The Safeguard Israel Act (S. 107), introduced by Senator Cruz, would have prevented the United States from making financial contributions to the United Nations or any U.N. organization until U.N. Security Council Resolution 2334, which Israeli settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem as illegal, had been repealed. This legislation concluded the 115th Congress with 24 cosponsors in the Senate. Foreign Policy for America opposed this legislation and scored those who cosponsored it negatively.

H.R. 3364, introduced by Congressman Royce, the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CAATSA), limited President Trump’s ability to unilaterally lift sanctions on Russia and added new sanctions against Russia’s energy and military sector while also implementing sanctions on North Korea and Iran. American intelligence agencies unanimously agreed that the Russian government directed an efforts to undermine and influence the 2016 presidential election. Russia also attacked and supports ongoing operations in Ukraine and annexed Crimea. The Senate passed this bill on July 27, 2017, by a vote of 98-2. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation.

S.J.Res.42, introduced by Senator Paul, would have disapproved of the proposed sales to the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia of certain defense articles in the wake of a Saudi Arabia-led war with Yemen that has produced the largest humanitarian crisis in the world. The Senate failed to pass this motion to discharge on June 13, 2017, by a vote of 47-53. Foreign Policy for America supported this legislation.